Challenge By Choice: A week without make-up

Challenge by Choice: an environment where participants are asked to search for opportunities to stretch and grow during the experience

I have decided to further challenge myself by eliminating makeup from my routine for a week. In the month of September, I stopped wearing make-up for an entire week to challenge my self-confidence and make a statement regarding traditional female beauty standards. This activity included, going to class, the gym, restaurants, etc. I am using this to fulfill “Exploring Avenues for Personal Development and Professional Achievement”.

 As a future female professional, I believe I could really benefit from a internal mental challenge (confidence-boost). I have grown up in a time where girls are encouraged to wear make-up at a young age and are increasingly being exposed to sexualized women on TV and in music, and even in their professions. I have spent so many years of my life wearing make-up as a way to hide my flaws, so I decided it was time to challenge myself in embracing them instead. It is rare to see a women walking around in public completely bare-faced; that is what I did. I also see this as an opportunity to take advantage of the time I will save to dedicate to other things I enjoy. A make-up routine can be time confusing and in the grand scheme of life, does not propel me to greatness. 

I want to be a lawyer in the future. I am at college to achieve this goal, so the week long opportunity to focus more on school and less on traditional female roles was enlightening and refreshing. Females are statistically less likely to make partner in a law firm than men. Lawyers have to command a room and women have to even more so to out shadow her male counterparts; this takes a lot of confidence and drive. While makeup does not seem to correlate, it does for women. I want to be seen as a legal powerhouse, whether I am a woman or not. However, I want to be a female powerhouse for my own satisfaction and the achievement of women in general.

For most people, I am sure it does not seem like makeup is a big deal. However, on a college campus, where everyone is in their prime, it is not exactly comfortable to be flawed. I am naturally a very self-conscious person so at first I was very uncomfortable knowing I could not shelter myself from judgement. After getting use to not wearing my makeup out, I felt more comfortable continuing throughout the week and then after the week was up as well. To this day I often forego my makeup routine for a little extra sleep. Looking back on the week, most people probably did not notice that I was doing anything different; this form of exercise was differently targeted at improving my own internal mental state.

I have continued to leave my makeup at home, and I have even been more likely to not travel with it at all. I know women are still trying to break the glass ceiling in business and other professions, which is hindered by the public believing we are only good for a pretty face. Women have begun to fight against the stereotypes given to our gender by refusing to shave, embracing their natural hair, and protesting for women’s rights. While I chose to do this for internal reasons, I also thought I could be inspiring for other woman on my campus. It is so much easier to feel confident when you see other confident people; I have been inspired by these people already. This is one of the more important activities I participated in this semester, because it is applicable across various areas of my life. By taking time to improve my internal self, instead of always focusing on others, I have put myself in position to be more effective in other facets of my life.

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**All Images included in this post are without make-up at various times throughout the Fall semester**

 

 

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LEAD TEAM: Grad Ball

Lead teams are interesting for me, because I am not used to taking a back seat in regards to event planning. Though I really don’t think I could designate time to coordinate a LEAD team, I really hate not having a very explicit and important role. I feel like I am following the motions for a lot of the tasks. However, they are fun because they allow for all the cohorts to get together; we don’t get much of this as we move up in the program.

So my LEAD team was in charge of Grad Ball, which hasn’t happened yet and is still in progress. I volunteered to be responsible for the graduate gift so I felt important, but we had to scrap that task. In our recent meeting, we designated committees to break up the work, which I think was a good tactical move. Hopefully, this will allow for each of us to get more involved. We have people for clean up, decorations, invitation, and others. I know the LAS grads really look forward to this event so I hope we can plan a great event for them. It is really the only  Really they just look forward to the gourmet cupcakes we provide 🙂

Facing Moral Problems

While Millennials are the most progressive and socially active, Americans specifically still face age old moral problems. My Philosophy class in the fall was about these moral problems and how we rationalize these problems and their facts to come to a conclusion and an opinion. We covered a broad spectrum of topics including, abortion, capital punishment, gay marriage, and torture among others. At face value, all of these topics are ones most individuals try to avoid at all costs; opinions are emotional and strong, which often leads to conflicts. I was especially nervous, because my class was comprised completely of passionate leaders, with strong will, and a personal friendship with me.

First, my professor was the quirkiest person I think I have ever met. I think it stemmed from extreme intelligence, but he was all over the place. I enjoyed this comic relief, even though he didn’t mean to, because it allowed for a relaxed and civil environment. Second, I personally am very reactive and very opinionated, which many don’t find surprising; that being said, I spoke a lot. I wish more people spoke up during the semester; the class was about being able to communicate and validate why we hold our opinions, and their were very few people who actively participated.

I learned a lot from this class that I think is relevant not only to leadership, but also life in general. I found myself very offended by some comments and I reacted well to some, and not well to others. I learned how to build arguments and validate my own opinions in a less reactive way and into a more educational way. Considering we are facing the same moral problems in the 21st Century as we did in the 19th, I think this class is an important one for leader and personal growth. PHL 118

This is my argument paper I wrote for philosophy in regards to prostitution: Prostitution Paper!!

 

From NARP, to Athlete: Drop It Like It’s Hot

NARP: Commonly used by collegiate athletes, meaning Non-Athlete Regular Person, used to describe students who are not on an athlete team.

I use to be a NARP, and then I made the CMU Dance Team. I quit dancing in high school, so it was really a shot in the dark as to whether I would be able to perform enough to make the team. I tried out and successfully completed by audition; I joined 24 other girls for the 2016-2017 season. The fun part, my mentee, Julia, who is also a dancer, joined the team!

It was a very hard transition at first. I was trained in classical ballet, which is very different from collegiate dance. I also didn’t know anyone well on the team, and there was really only one person who went out of their way to talk to me. With time, I gained many relationships and dance team became my primary friend group. My relationships from last year started to fade as we all got involved in new things, and I became connected deeply to my team. We performed at football games and got incredibly busy once basketball started, with games 2 to 3 times a week. Practices were at 6:30AM, which was the hardest transition for me; I slept at ridiculous times in the day to make it through, to the point where I never saw my roommates.

This season was very interesting. There was a lot of cliques on the teams, which is to be expected in a group of 25 girls. Four girls were removed or quit our team and the stress of games,  practice, and social issues, were a lot for all of us. It was really great to get to dance again in spite of everything. We even got the opportunity to go to Las Vegas for Dance Team Nationals. It was a first year competition, which means we were setting a new standard for dance competitions. All in all, the season ended in a positive fashion and I have gained a lot of friends who I look forward to maintaining into the following years, even if I am not not the team again. 

 

Theory Application: My Freshman Year of College

My leadership style has definitely changed since being in college, because I’ve been exposed to other styles and people. I have become more conscious of myself as a leader and think for the first time I’ve begun to identify how I can get better. In my leadership philosophy paper I tried to emphasize  the things I can already do and the also thing things I want to be able to do. It is really hard to look at yourself and be judgmental, but I think it is the only way I will get better as a leader, as well as a person.

The one experience I’ve had thus far in college with a leadership theory was my first group project in Business 100. We didn’t get to pick our groups, so it was my first experience truly working with people I didn’t know. I became the team leader, not even because I volunteered, but no one else wanted to. I have a very direct leadership style, similarly to the ideas discussed in Path-Goal theory. I know this often comes off as bossy and brass to people, so I consciously made an effort to ease into the group project and assess my group members before choosing which leadership path I was going to make. I also lack patience in many situations and expect perfection; perfection is different for everyone so I had to accept that someone else’s hard work may not be to my standard and I would have to roll with what I had.

Specifically how I applied this theory was in regards to my group members business ability. I felt like I was answering a lot of dumb questions regarding research, work ethic, and comprehension so I had to make sure my reaction to these questions was appropriate for the situation. When I was growing more and more frustrated I had to look internally and decide what type of leader I wanted to be. At that point, the needs of the group and the project required something different than what I wanted to give, therefore I had to choose to be a responsible, respectful leader instead of reacting in a way I personally wanted to. Leadership is definitely learning to put your emotions aside for the greater good of your followers. I think learning about leadership theories has made me see ways in which I can improve and grow and I look forward to seeing my growth over the next few years.

Connections Conference 2015

Connections Conference is a 2 day leadership seminar hosted at Great Wolf Lodge in Traverse City by the Leadership Institute at Central Michigan University. Though it is an LAS protocol requirement, it is also open to all members of the university. This year we bussed 200 Central Michigan students and staff to participate in leadership development.Because this conference was meant as professional development, we were required to dress up. This was particularly fun for me because I love dressing up and you don’t have many excuses to in college! I would also like to thank the catering staff for the amazing food. My friends told me it was going to warm ham sandwiches all weekend and I was delightfully pleased with the 3 course meals.

Right off the bat, we were all randomly assigned into Institutes that would act as home base for the conference. This group and leaders focused on the asset/goals plan for us as leaders in our organizations on campus. They showed us how to set goals for our RSO at CMU, how to determine the assets we have to take advantage of, and the factors that have hindered our progress. This process is meant to create goals that we could take back to campus and implement and teach others.

The first educational session I attended was “It’s Not Me, It’s You” in which the topic was how to deal with difficult individuals in leadership, jobs, and life. I personally found this beneficial because there is never a time where you get to choose who you work with. Often times you have to bite your tongue and just survive. One of the things I took from this session was the process of addressing a conflict. My presenter stated, If something bothers you for more that 24 hours, you have 24 hours to then address it. If this time elapses, you must let it go. I never thought of frustration or annoyance as having an expiration date, but it completely makes sense. As leaders, we have to be able to continue to have meaningful and beneficial relationships with the people we work with so I believe this is a great philosophy for everyone to adopt.

One of the other sessions I enjoyed was presented by the one and only, Erin Gaken. First of all, her baby bump was absolutely adorable! Her presentation was “Men can Cry, Women Don’t Have To”, which was focused on gender stereotypes in the workplace. Typically, women are stereotyped as being emotionally driven, where as men are expected to be manly and less emotional. While Erin spoke, I realized how often I’ve accepted these stereotypes. But even so, I am an emotional woman and I enjoy men who can express emotion. At first glance, this doesn’t seem like it would relate to leadership, but on a deeper level, leaders must be accepting, understanding, and thoughtful. If we as leaders refuse to accept each individual for their character and personality, whether it be emotional or unemotional, weak or strong, feminine or manly, we cannot be effective. I found this to be most benefitial to me because I realized a stereotype I’ve been accepting and hope to adjust my mindset to accommodate all individuals as I am a leader of today.

To be honest, I didn’t anticipate making many strong bonds with anyone other than my cohort at Connections. But to my surprise, I met a man named Jack. To this day we talk on a daily basis and get lunch together or go to SAC together often. I really value Jack as a person, and I think he makes me a better person. Out of the whole weekend he is definitely my favorite part (yes, even over the water park), because I believe we will be long time friends. I think we were meant to meet each other to challenge each other, which is what the LI and the Connections Conference intended for us to experience.

Connections Conference 2015

Connections Conference 2015