Challenge By Choice: A week without make-up

Challenge by Choice: an environment where participants are asked to search for opportunities to stretch and grow during the experience

I have decided to further challenge myself by eliminating makeup from my routine for a week. In the month of September, I stopped wearing make-up for an entire week to challenge my self-confidence and make a statement regarding traditional female beauty standards. This activity included, going to class, the gym, restaurants, etc. I am using this to fulfill “Exploring Avenues for Personal Development and Professional Achievement”.

 As a future female professional, I believe I could really benefit from a internal mental challenge (confidence-boost). I have grown up in a time where girls are encouraged to wear make-up at a young age and are increasingly being exposed to sexualized women on TV and in music, and even in their professions. I have spent so many years of my life wearing make-up as a way to hide my flaws, so I decided it was time to challenge myself in embracing them instead. It is rare to see a women walking around in public completely bare-faced; that is what I did. I also see this as an opportunity to take advantage of the time I will save to dedicate to other things I enjoy. A make-up routine can be time confusing and in the grand scheme of life, does not propel me to greatness. 

I want to be a lawyer in the future. I am at college to achieve this goal, so the week long opportunity to focus more on school and less on traditional female roles was enlightening and refreshing. Females are statistically less likely to make partner in a law firm than men. Lawyers have to command a room and women have to even more so to out shadow her male counterparts; this takes a lot of confidence and drive. While makeup does not seem to correlate, it does for women. I want to be seen as a legal powerhouse, whether I am a woman or not. However, I want to be a female powerhouse for my own satisfaction and the achievement of women in general.

For most people, I am sure it does not seem like makeup is a big deal. However, on a college campus, where everyone is in their prime, it is not exactly comfortable to be flawed. I am naturally a very self-conscious person so at first I was very uncomfortable knowing I could not shelter myself from judgement. After getting use to not wearing my makeup out, I felt more comfortable continuing throughout the week and then after the week was up as well. To this day I often forego my makeup routine for a little extra sleep. Looking back on the week, most people probably did not notice that I was doing anything different; this form of exercise was differently targeted at improving my own internal mental state.

I have continued to leave my makeup at home, and I have even been more likely to not travel with it at all. I know women are still trying to break the glass ceiling in business and other professions, which is hindered by the public believing we are only good for a pretty face. Women have begun to fight against the stereotypes given to our gender by refusing to shave, embracing their natural hair, and protesting for women’s rights. While I chose to do this for internal reasons, I also thought I could be inspiring for other woman on my campus. It is so much easier to feel confident when you see other confident people; I have been inspired by these people already. This is one of the more important activities I participated in this semester, because it is applicable across various areas of my life. By taking time to improve my internal self, instead of always focusing on others, I have put myself in position to be more effective in other facets of my life.

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**All Images included in this post are without make-up at various times throughout the Fall semester**

 

 

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Leadership in Communication

In a full circle back to last years LDR 200, my LAS class took a communications class focused solely on how it interacts with leadership. I have to say, I have lost the meaning of “leadership”. It’s like if you eat the same food for a week long, you end up hating the food; thats how I feel about leadership. I came into college thinking leader was the best thing to aspire to. Realistically, it is an undefinable word that no one can really give you or anyone else. I will say, this class has many important lessons regardless on a leadership position; communication is key of course.

I believe communication in the work place is one of the most important lessons from this class. We really broke down the dynamics of work place involvement and mutual respect. We discussed dealing with conflict, be an appropriate follower, and addressing when to take advantage of your personal leadership in a hierarchy. I have never been in a super professional work place, but I know I have some traits that could get me in trouble in a follower position. I do like evaluating my personality in classes like this.

The problem with “leadership in communication” is we can never stop communicating; but through all my leadership courses, it seems as if you can never stop being a leader either, which is exhausting to think about. In addition to that, those who aren’t leaders still communicate, so yes you have communication in leadership, but you don’t have to have leadership to communicate. These connections are what make it so difficult to define both terms across a broad board and for different groups of people.

Connections Conference 2015

Connections Conference is a 2 day leadership seminar hosted at Great Wolf Lodge in Traverse City by the Leadership Institute at Central Michigan University. Though it is an LAS protocol requirement, it is also open to all members of the university. This year we bussed 200 Central Michigan students and staff to participate in leadership development.Because this conference was meant as professional development, we were required to dress up. This was particularly fun for me because I love dressing up and you don’t have many excuses to in college! I would also like to thank the catering staff for the amazing food. My friends told me it was going to warm ham sandwiches all weekend and I was delightfully pleased with the 3 course meals.

Right off the bat, we were all randomly assigned into Institutes that would act as home base for the conference. This group and leaders focused on the asset/goals plan for us as leaders in our organizations on campus. They showed us how to set goals for our RSO at CMU, how to determine the assets we have to take advantage of, and the factors that have hindered our progress. This process is meant to create goals that we could take back to campus and implement and teach others.

The first educational session I attended was “It’s Not Me, It’s You” in which the topic was how to deal with difficult individuals in leadership, jobs, and life. I personally found this beneficial because there is never a time where you get to choose who you work with. Often times you have to bite your tongue and just survive. One of the things I took from this session was the process of addressing a conflict. My presenter stated, If something bothers you for more that 24 hours, you have 24 hours to then address it. If this time elapses, you must let it go. I never thought of frustration or annoyance as having an expiration date, but it completely makes sense. As leaders, we have to be able to continue to have meaningful and beneficial relationships with the people we work with so I believe this is a great philosophy for everyone to adopt.

One of the other sessions I enjoyed was presented by the one and only, Erin Gaken. First of all, her baby bump was absolutely adorable! Her presentation was “Men can Cry, Women Don’t Have To”, which was focused on gender stereotypes in the workplace. Typically, women are stereotyped as being emotionally driven, where as men are expected to be manly and less emotional. While Erin spoke, I realized how often I’ve accepted these stereotypes. But even so, I am an emotional woman and I enjoy men who can express emotion. At first glance, this doesn’t seem like it would relate to leadership, but on a deeper level, leaders must be accepting, understanding, and thoughtful. If we as leaders refuse to accept each individual for their character and personality, whether it be emotional or unemotional, weak or strong, feminine or manly, we cannot be effective. I found this to be most benefitial to me because I realized a stereotype I’ve been accepting and hope to adjust my mindset to accommodate all individuals as I am a leader of today.

To be honest, I didn’t anticipate making many strong bonds with anyone other than my cohort at Connections. But to my surprise, I met a man named Jack. To this day we talk on a daily basis and get lunch together or go to SAC together often. I really value Jack as a person, and I think he makes me a better person. Out of the whole weekend he is definitely my favorite part (yes, even over the water park), because I believe we will be long time friends. I think we were meant to meet each other to challenge each other, which is what the LI and the Connections Conference intended for us to experience.

Connections Conference 2015

Connections Conference 2015